Installing Ubuntu Linux Dual Boot

By | 19/02/2014

Linux Dual Boot Ubuntu With Windows 7

Ubuntu is a community developed operating system that is perfect for laptops, desktops and servers. Whether you use it at home, at school or at work Ubuntu contains all the applications you’ll ever need, from word processing and email applications, to web server software and programming tools.Installing Ubuntu Linux Dual Boot
 
 Ubuntu is and always will be free of charge. You do not pay any licensing fees. You can download, use and share Ubuntu with your friends, family, school or business for absolutely nothing.
Installing Ubuntu Linux Dual Boot

What is Ubuntu? 

Loved by millions worldwide, Ubuntu is a secure, stylish operating system that couldn’t be easier to use. With no unnecessary trial software and clutter, it’s fast and it stays fast. It has amazing support for the web, thanks to the best, most secure and fastest browsers. And you can choose from thousands of free applications in the Ubuntu Software Centre. 
 This is by no means a complete list of Free operating systems… but that is all for today folks… I will be updating this list through out this week. My aim is to make this the best resource for finding a free alternative to Microsoft Windows and other proprietary Operating systems.

Installing Ubuntu Linux Dual Boot

 

Ubuntu Linux OS  Unknown Fact

The version number of a particular Ubuntu release is actually the release year and month. 
So for example, the very first Ubuntu release is 4.10 because it was released in October, 2004.
The recent Ubuntu 13.10 was released in October, 2013.

A new release of Ubuntu becomes available every six months, and every fourth release becomes a long-term-support (LTS) version. these are Uknown Fact Ubuntu Linux OS.
About Ubuntu Linux OS
Ubuntu is an ancient African word meaning ‘humanity to others’. It also means ‘I am what I am because of who we all are’. The Ubuntu operating system brings the spirit of Ubuntu to the world of computers.
Linux was already established as an enterprise server platform in 2004, but free software was not a part of everyday life for most computer users. That’s why Mark Shuttleworth gathered a small team of developers from one of the most established Linux projects – Debian – and set out to create an easy-to-use Linux desktop: Ubuntu.
The vision for Ubuntu is part social and part economic: free software, available to everybody on the same terms, and funded through a portfolio of services provided by Canonical.
The Ubuntu team broke new ground in committing to a programme of scheduled releases on a predictable six-month basis. It was decided that every fourth release, issued on a two-year basis, would receive long-term support (LTS). LTS releases are typically used for large-scale deployments.
Ubuntu is different from the commercial Linux offerings that preceded it because it doesn’t divide its efforts between a high-quality commercial version and a free ‘community’ version. The commercial and community teams collaborate to produce a single, high-quality release, which receives ongoing maintenance for a defined period. Both the release and ongoing updates are freely available to all users.
The first official Ubuntu release — Version 4.10, codenamed the ‘Warty Warthog’ — was launched in October 2004, and sparked dramatic global interest as thousands of free software enthusiasts and experts joined the Ubuntu community.
After many years Ubuntu still is and always will be free to use, share and develop. We hope it will bring a touch of light to your computing — and we hope that you’ll join us in helping to build the next version.Installing Ubuntu Linux Dual Boot

 



How To Install Ubuntu Dual Boot With Windows 7

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